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Sunday, May 17, 2020 | History

2 edition of Revelation, a Protestant view found in the catalog.

Revelation, a Protestant view

Roger freМЂre

Revelation, a Protestant view

the Dogmatic Constitution on divine revelation, a commentary

by Roger freМЂre

  • 308 Want to read
  • 1 Currently reading

Published by Newman Press in Westminster, Md .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Revelation.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Roger Schutz and Max Thurian. Pref. by Henri de Lubac.
    ContributionsThurian, Max, joint author., Vatican Council (2nd : 1962-1965).
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBX830 1962.A45 C774
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 104 p.
    Number of Pages104
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5613404M
    LC Control Number68021453

    According to this view, Revelation records the gradual unfolding of God’s plan for history up to the present. A majority of Protestant Reformers held to a version of this view. They viewed Revelation as a prophetic survey of church history and used this interpretation to argue that the pope of .   Boring seems to be correct when he notes that “although widely held by Protestant interpreters after the Reformation and into the twentieth century, no critical New Testament scholar today advocates this view” (M. Eugene Boring, Revelation: Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching [Louisville: John Knox, ], 49).

      How to Talk to Protestants about Divine Revelation: Point to Jesus If you want to point Protestants to the Catholic faith, you cannot point to the Vatican, to the sacraments, to the Virgin Mary, or to any other matters of theological disagreement that have for so long clouded Protestant .   > Why do Catholic Bibles not include the Book of Revelation? I heard or read somewhere that the Book of Revelation isn’t included in Catholic Bibles, but that they have 73 books instead of the Protest which Protestants know as the ‘Apocryp.

      Protestantism and Revelation J by Bryce Laliberte If by “revelation” is meant some sort of uncovering of the truth, of God making something known, then if God were to “reveal” something, but not in such a way that it might be reasonably known and understood, could it even be called revelation? Coming Soon is a verse-by-verse commentary on the Book of Revelation using the Revised Standard Version: Catholic Edition of the Bible. Barber provides a Catholic interpretation, which sees the liturgical background of this book of Scripture—a perspective missing in many Protestant commentaries.


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Revelation, a Protestant view by Roger freМЂre Download PDF EPUB FB2

This explication of a Protestant view of revelation by two well known theologians of the Protestant religious community of Taize is therefore as welcome as it is thoughtful and a Protestant view book. The book takes the form of a commentary on the conciliar constitution Dei Verbum (on divine revelation).

The first view of Revelation is the idealist view or the spiritual view. This view uses the allegorical method to interpret the Book of Revelation. The allegorical approach to Revelation was introduced by ancient church father Origen ( A.

D.) and made prominent by Augustine ( A. D.). I once heard someone say (I wish I could remember whom) that Revelation wasn’t read in the church because it is enacted at every liturgy. I don’t know how commonly that view is held but it was helpful to me as an ex-Protestant to see Revelation in a very different light.

The Book of Revelation is not a prophecy of some future or imminent return of Christ. It is a symbolic record of the victory of the Church over the world of evil especially during the days of Revelation. Protestants usually look at the Book of Revelation as in the future concerning the End Times whereas, the Catholic View looks at it in various ways.

Catholics do see some of the End Times in it but also a vision of the Mass in general. The new view, therefore, began to argue that none of the events described in the Book of Revelation after chapters (i.e., John's vision and the letters to the seven churches of Asia) had yet.

THE BOOK OF REVELATION. The Apocalypse, or Revelation to John, the last book of the Bible, is one of the most difficult to understand because it abounds in unfamiliar and extravagant symbolism, which at best appears unusual to the modern reader.

Symbolic language, however, is one of the chief characteristics of apocalyptic literature, of which this book is an outstanding example. Luther on Revelation: "I feel an aversion to it, and to me this is sufficient reason for rejecting it." The following link popped up a few weeks ago: Martin Luther- The Bare Truth Unfolded.

The hosting website isand, as far as I can tell, is some sort of Anti-Islam pro-Roman Catholic : James Swan. Currently in the Liturgies of daily Mass we have been reading the Book of Revelation.

It is commonly read at the end of the liturgical year, for it bespeaks the end of, and passing qualities of all things of this world. It is also a book of glory, depicting the ultimate victory of our Lord Continue reading "Why the Modern View of the Book of Revelation may be Flawed.".

The interpretation of the book of Revelation has often proven difficult throughout the history of the Christian church. Though it is little more than a piece of scholarly gossip, some have even suggested that the Reformer John Calvin, one of the best interpreters of the Scriptures the church has known, shied away from writing a commentary on the book of Revelation for this very reason.

One of the problems the historicist view encounters is that the events of the book of Revelation appear to be clustered within a relatively short time period (Rev. Rev. +; Rev. +, Rev. +; Rev.

In order to apply this period to history from the time of John to that of the interpreter, the days of the time period. The name Revelation comes from the first word of the book in Koine Greek: ἀποκάλυψις (apokalypsis), which means "unveiling" or "revelation".The author names himself as "John", but modern scholars consider it unlikely that the author of Revelation also wrote the Gospel of John.

He was a Jewish Christian prophet, probably belonging to a group of such prophets, and was accepted by the. The book of Revelation, quipped Ambrose Bierce, is "a famous book in which St.

John the Divine concealed all that he knew. The revealing is done by the commentators, who know nothing.". Daniel Revelation; Daniel After this I saw in the night visions, and behold a fourth beast, dreadful and terrible, and strong exceedingly; and it had great iron teeth: it devoured and brake in pieces, and stamped the residue with the feet of it: and it was diverse from all the beasts that were before it; and it had ten horns.: Revelation And I stood upon the sand of the sea, and saw.

This is actually the view that will be taken by Saint Augustine, that there is nothing predicted in absolute historical terms anywhere in the Book of Revelation; it is all mere symbolism.

According to the preterist approach, most of the prophecies in the book of Revelation were fulfilled not long after John wrote. v In other words, their fulfillment is past from the perspective of the twenty-first century.

vi The fourth major approach to the book is the idealist or symbolic approach. According to this view, Revelation does not Author: Keith Mathison. The Book of Revelation is perhaps the most mysterious book in Sacred Scripture.

And there has been much speculation about it --some of it bordering on off-the-wall, but some of it serious and scholarly. The following is the forward and a portion of a chapter from a forthcoming book which, in my view.

Each chapter begins with a passage of the Book of Revelation, followed by an explanation that searches for the main theme in that passage, and concludes with a reflection that casts light on the meaning of the text for today.

A thorough bibliography provides resources for further study.4/5(12). From The Book of Revelation For Dummies. By Richard Wagner, Larry R. Helyer. If you’re befuddled by the Book of Revelation in the Bible, don’t fret.

Take a look at the basic structure of the Book of Revelation; its major interpretations; the various perspectives on the Millennial Kingdom mentioned in Revelation 20; and how key events shaped John the Apostle and his writing.

Revelation The Dragon pursuing a woman, from the Bamberg Apocalypse ©. The Book of Revelation, the last book of the Bible, has fascinated and puzzled Christians for centuries.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Roger, frère, Revelation, a Protestant view. Westminster, Md., Newman Press [] (OCoLC)  The Book of Revelation, often called the Revelation to John, the Apocalypse of John, The Revelation, or simply Revelation or Apocalypse (and often misquoted as Revelations), is a book.

Protestant Historicism - The Key to Daniel and Revelation Truth in History. Historical Setting of the Book of Revelation - Duration: “Revelation’s Mark of the Beast Exposed”.